A brief excerpt to tempt you to read further

“born Mira in the kingdom of the Gran Mogol, or the Great Mughals, where she was captured by the Portuguese who eventually sold her to the Spanish at the port of Manila. From there she was taken to Acapulco and on to the city of Puebla in Mexico. Along the way she converted to Catholicism and was given a new name, Catarina de San Juan…. So beloved was Catarina that the Church leaders in Puebla wanted to see her canonized. But despite their prodigious writings, the Holy Church in Europe did not allow it. In fact, the Church was uncomfortable with the power an Asian woman had garnered and proceeded to ban all images and books about her. As with most instances of censorship, such efforts only served to increase Catarina’s fame. In the absence of a textual record she was given yet another persona, in the popular imagination she became China Poblana, or the Asian woman of Puebla (in the colonial era the word china was used to refer to anything or anyone that came from Asia).”
— By Meha Priyadarshini, published in the South Asian American Digital Archive

mughal-princess

Image: South Asian American Digital Archive

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Image: South Asian American Digital Archive